Otis White

School of Public Affairs
Phoenix
Faculty Associate
Faculty
DTPHX Campus
Mailcode
3720
Faculty Associate
Faculty
DTPHX Campus
Mailcode
3720

Biography

During the past 30 years while working as an entrepreneur, university/community college instructor, business consultant and corporate educator, entrepreneurship and self-employment theory have held a keen interest for Otis White. The driving force behind most of his interests over the years has been the interaction with those folks who have chosen this path as their life’s direction and the effects of the business climate, where they operate, on their success. White has taught the Entrepreneurship Senior Capstone course in the Morrison School Business Administration program at the Arizona State University Polytechnic campus as well as developed courses in small business management, capitalism's philosophical history and the relation of capitalism in the U.S. to the Constitution. As he has researched the course syllabi and worked through the prevailing literature in these areas, White has come to understand the phenomenon of the explosion of entrepreneurship worldwide in a much larger and more complex perspective.

In his role as faculty chair at Rio Salado College, now retired, White worked to bring a certificate and an associate's degree to the public administration domain. This effort included a pathway for students into the School of Public Affairs at ASU, where he now teaches. he believes that in today's world partnerships across government, both federal and local, and the private sector are critical in moving society forward. White also believes that social entrepreneursim will play a large role in the future to solve many of the most troubling social problems of the nation. 

A large part of White's research and course material development has been directed by the research of Babson College and the Kauffman Foundation and their affiliation with the GEM Consortium. In the Babson/Kauffman perspective, entrepreneurship is more than just a life style choice; it is a gateway for the movement of millions of people around the world from poverty to the middle class through the dynamics of a free market economy and personal choice. From the GEM Consortium’s point of view, the explosion of economic freedom around the world which was catalyzed by the fall of the Berlin Wall has unleashed a tidal wave of increasing prosperity in many places around the globe. 

In a 2005, GEM Consortium report it was estimated that 24 million Americans made this move from poverty to the middle class in 2004 alone. The article went on to estimate the number approached 500 million worldwide. Students today will live this new dynamic as a central part of their lives even though in current times it seems a distant future. They will be the ones who, for good or for ill, set the public policy and education agenda on which our economic outcomes will depend.  In his "Waging the War of Ideas" (2001), John Blundell speaks to the direction of public and educational policies and their effect on the rising tide of wealth and prosperity in the world. We need to educate our students as to the choices, social implications and outcomes their votes and actions will sustain. We need to educate them as to the potential future they can build for themselves through entrepreneurship. We need to educate them in how to develop businesses that provide jobs and are sustainable forms of capitalism.

Adam Smith said: "To feel much for others and little for ourselves; to restrain our selfishness and exercise our benevolent affections, constitute the perfection of human nature."

How we educate tomorrow’s business leaders to balance community with capitalism is as important a question as we can ask today. Thus White's interest in educating students about the entrepreneurial world we live in and the need for a careful and rigorous approach to the creation of those curricula.

Research Interests

During the past 30 years while working as an entrepreneur, university/community college instructor, business consultant and corporate educator, entrepreneurship and self-employment theory have held a keen interest for me.  The driving force behind most of my interests over the years has been my interaction with those folks who have chosen this path as their lifes direction and the effects of the business climate, where they operate, on their success.  I have taught the Entrepreneurship Senior Capstone course in the Morrison School Business Administration program at the ASU Polytechnic campus as well as developed courses in small business management, capitalism's philosophical history and the relation of capitalism in the US to the Constitution.  As I have researched the course syllabi and worked through the prevailing literature in these areas I have come to understand the phenomenon of the explosion of entrepreneurship worldwide in a much larger and more complex perspective.

In my Faculty Chair role at Rio Salado College, now retired, I worked to bring a Certificate and an Associates degree to the Public Administration domain. This effort included a pathway for students into the School of Public Affairs where I now teach. This because I believe that in today's world partnerships across government, both Federal and Local, and the private sector are critical in moving our society forward. I also believe that Social Entrepreneursim will play a large role in the future to solve many of our most troubling social problems as a nation. 

A large part of my research and course material development has been directed by the research of Babson College and the Kauffman Foundation and their affiliation with the GEM Consortium (http://www.gemconsortium.org). In the Babson/Kauffman perspective, entrepreneurship is more than just a life style choice; it is a gateway for the movement of millions of people around the world from poverty to the middle class through the dynamics of a free market economy and personal choice.  From the GEM Consortiums point of view the explosion of economic freedom around the world which was catalyzed by the fall of the Berlin Wall has unleashed a tidal wave of increasing prosperity in many places around the globe. 

In a 2005 GEM Consortium report it was estimated that 24 million Americans made this move from poverty to the middle class in 2004 alone.  The article went on to estimate the number approached 500 million worldwide.  My students today will live this new dynamic as a central part of their lives even though in current times it seems a distant future.  They will be the ones who, for good or for ill, set the public policy and education agenda on which our economic outcomes will depend.  In his Waging the War of Ideas (2001), John Blundell speaks to the direction of public and educational policies and their effect on the rising tide of wealth and prosperity in the world. We need to educate our students as to the choices, social implications and outcomes their votes and actions will sustain.  We need to educate them as to the potential future they can build for themselves through entrepreneurship. We need to educate them in how to develop businesses that provide jobs and are sustainable forms of capitalism.

Adam Smith said: "To feel much for others and little for ourselves; to restrain our selfishness and exercise our benevolent affections, constitute the perfection of human nature."

How we educate tomorrows business leaders to balance community with capitalism is as important a question as we can ask today. Thus my interest in educating students about the entrepreneurial world we live in and the need for a careful and rigorous approach to the creation of those curricula.

Courses

Fall 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 410Building Leadership Skills
Summer 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change
Spring 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change
Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change
PAF 410Building Leadership Skills
Summer 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 420Public Leadership
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change
PAF 410Building Leadership Skills
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change
Summer 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change
PAF 410Building Leadership Skills
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change
Summer 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PAF 311Leadership and Change